Following our recent post (Making your own Whisky at Mackmyra) we would like to tip you about the post “A Wise Investment?” at the Scotch Blog by it’s author Kevin.

Kevin gives you all his insights on buying your own cask. In the end though, he seems to come up with the same conclusion as we do. Buying your OWN cask is not about finances in the end, it’s about having YOUR OWN cask.

Read the full story here.

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Apparently good things comes to those who wait.
This is a photo of The 38yr Limited Edition Balblair. Made a visit to their website and noted some fine awards for this one. Wish I had one in my collection.

The prizes:
2006
International Wine & Spirit Competition
Gold Best in Class

International Spirits Challenge
Gold

2005
International Wine & Spirit Competition
Gold Best in Class

International Wine & Spirit Competition
a’bunadh Trophy for Special Edition
Single Malt Whisky

Read the tasting notes here.

Hanyu
Hanyu distillery was founded in 1941 in Hanyu city 60 km from Tokyo. It was licensed to make whisky in 1946, 54 years later the distillery was closed. Unfortunately the distillery was dismantled right after the company was sold in 2004.

In the Spring of 2005, during a private tasting in the Highlander Inn in Craigellachie Scotland, whisky lover Jeroen Koetsier came across an extraordinary cask sample of Hanyu. Soon after, a private cask of Hanyu 1988 was bought and bottled. Due to the excellent feedback from across the globe on both label and liquor, Full Proof Europe was founded.

Now you can get your hands on one of the bottles in a Limited edition of 408 numbered bottles. Bottled at Full Proof from cask 9204.

Visit Full Proof for more info

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A bottle of whisky which experts believe could be the oldest in existence has sold at a Bonhams auction house in London for £14,850.
The Glenavon Special Liqueur Whisky is believed to have been bottled about 150 years ago at the Glenavon Distillery, which was located in Banffshire. There was gobal interest in the sale, with bidders from the Far East and US. The bottle, which has been owned by an Irish family for generations, eventually went to an anonymous bidder.

Read the full story at BBC NEWS